Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

kevinbrown studycover 2020Abstract
This article investigates the implications of recent research findings that establish that older victims of crime are less likely to obtain procedural justice than other age groups. It explores original empirical data from the United Kingdom that finds evidence of a systemic failure amongst agencies to identify vulnerability in the older population and to put in place appropriate support mechanisms to allow older victims to participate fully in the justice system. The article discusses how the legally defined gateways to additional support, which are currently relied upon by many common law jurisdictions, disadvantage older victims and require reimagining. It argues that international protocols, especially the current European Union Directive on victims’ rights, are valuable guides in this process of re-conceptualisation. To reduce further the inequitable treatment of older victims, the article advocates for jurisdictions to introduce a presumption in favour of special assistance for older people participating in the justice system.


Source: Brown, K., & Gordon, F. (2020). Improving access to justice for older victims of crime by reimagining conceptions of vulnerability. Ageing and Society, 1-18. doi:10.1017/S0144686X20001051


Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

screen shot 2020 06 12 at 2.23.58 pmThe objective of this tri-provincial (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba) research study funded by the PrairieAction Foundation was to explore the reasons for under-reporting in cases of abuse against older adults living in the community.

This summary report of findings follows a webinar which addressed the study, held in April 2020. 

See also: Media Scan of Older Adults in Canada during COVID-19 Pandemic: Impacts on Abuse of Older Adults Living in the Community

Authors of the summary report: 
Kerstin Roger, Donna Goodridge, Michelle Ranville, Christine A. Walsh, Cewick, M, Hall, K., Liepert, C., Songose, L., Anjorin-Ohu, K., PausJenssen, E.

User Rating: 2 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Abstract

''Given that ‘home’ is the major physical‐spatial environment of many older adults and that home, social and neighbourhood environments are well‐recognised to impact both the ability to age in place and quality of life in this population, a better understanding of the nature of social interactions within seniors’ communal living environments is critical for health promotion. This paper describes a two‐phase participatory research study examining peer bullying by older adults conducted in April and May, 2016. Responding to needs expressed by tenants, the objectives of this study were to identify the nature, prevalence and consequences of peer bullying for tenants of two low‐income senior apartment communities. In collaboration with the local Older Adult Abuse Task Force, a screening survey on bullying was distributed to all tenants. Findings (n = 49) indicated that 39% of tenants had witnessed peer bullying and 29% had experienced bullying by peers. An adapted version of a youth bullying survey was administered in follow‐up face‐to‐face interviews with 13 tenants. The most common forms of peer bullying were deliberate social exclusion and hurtful comments. The majority of respondents indicated that bullying was a problem for seniors and that bullies hurt other people. Outcomes of bullying included feelings of dejection and difficulties conducting everyday activities.''

Donna Goodridge RN, PhD, Jennifer Heal‐Salahub RN, MN, Elliot PausJenssen MSW, George James BA Hons, MA, Joan Lidington BSN, BSW.

To access the full length paper, visit the Wiley Online Library

 

 

User Rating: 2 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Abstract:
"This chapter reviews bullying and relational aggression among LGBT older adults. The intent of this chapter is to define and characterize late-life bullying in general and discuss unique manifestations of this phenomenon for LGBT elders. Special attention is given to peer victimization associated with intersectionality and microaggressions for this population, as well as common types of bullying and the impact bullying experiences have on emotional well-being and quality of life. Promising interventions to minimize bullying related to sexual orientation and gender identity in senior living environments are discussed and include civility training, bystander intervention, and policies and procedures that guide respectful social interactions and prohibit discriminatory actions."

Bonifas R.P. (2016) The Prevalence of Elder Bullying and Impact on LGBT Elders.

This chapter is part of the Handbook of LGBT Elders - An Interdisciplinary Approach to Principles, Practices, and Policies 
Harley D., Teaster P. (eds) Handbook of LGBT Elders. Springer, Cham

Source: SpringerLink

User Rating: 2 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
The following is part of our project “Increasing Access to Justice for Older Adult Victims of Sexual Assault: A Capacity Building Approach”, funded by the Justice Canada Victims Fund.Learn more about this project or consult the full list of resources

 

ABSTRACT:
Implicit ageist beliefs about the warmth and incompetence of older adults may influence jurors’ perceptions and judgments of an older adult’s competence in legal cases hinging on capacity and consent, including elder sexual abuse. However, little is known about the nuances of implicit agism in elder sexual abuse cases, and if it can be attenuated. The current study proposed to address these gaps via a randomized vignette design administered to a community sample of 391 US adults. Mock juror participants evaluated an elder sexual abuse case involving an older married couple, in which the victim had dementia. Results suggest that implicit agism was present among mock jurors, consistent with a warm-incompetence bias, and was predictive of mock jurors’ guilt ratings. Age and dementia-relevant jury instructions and mock juror gender were not found to be predictive of guilt ratings. Implicit agism among jurors should be addressed to reduce the potential for implicit age bias to affect elder sexual abuse cases.

Maggie L. Syme & Tracy J. Cohn (2019):  Elder sexual abuse and implicit agism: examining the warm-incompetent bias among mock jurors, Journal of Elder Abuse &Neglect, DOI: 10.1080/08946566.2019.1695696

To access the full article:  Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect

 

Publishing Criteria

Any resource posted on the Hub is first screened based on the publishing criteria. If you wish to share a resource with the community, please ensure that it fits the requirements and email it to us. We usually post material within 72hrs of receiving it. 

Publishing Criteria

Invitation to Contribute

Become a contributor to the hub!

  • Share your ongoing projects, research updates and favourite tools
  • Announce your upcoming events
  • Tell us about promising practices and initiatives via a blog post.

Check out our publishing criteria or email us for more information 

Thank You to Our Supporters and Sponsors

Le RCPMTA souhaite remercier les généreux sponsors qui contribuent à la durabilité du connecteur des savoirs.

silverfoxpharmacy12straightblack2